The Washington Family Edward savage


The Washington Family by Edward Savage is a life-sized group portrait of U. S. President George Washington, First Lady Martha Washington, two of her grandchildren, and an enslaved servant. Based on life studies made early in Washington's presidency, Savage began the work in New York City, 1789-90, and completed it several years later in Philadelphia, 1795-96.[ The enormous painting (7 ft. x 9 ft. 4 in. / .) is now at the National Gallery of Art, Washington, DC.

The image was a famous one in the 19th century. Prints were mass-produced by Savage beginning in 1798, and by John Sartain in 1840.

The setting for the painting is idealized, with the Potomac River flowing in the background. Shown are grandson George Washington Parke Custis, George Washington, granddaughter Eleanor Parke Custis, Martha Washington, and an enslaved servant (probably Christopher Sheels). With a plan of the future city of Washington, D.C. in front of her, Martha Washington is, according to Savage, "pointing with her fan to the grand avenue", which is now the National Mall.


This piece of the 1848 cornerstone of the Washington Monument was cut by Dr. Joseph Meredith Toner before a new foundation covered the original cornerstone when construction re-started.


Building the capitol




1913


1924 Moving house passing the White House


1315 Duke Street that used to house a slave pen just before the Civil War


Walt Whitman sees President Lincoln traveling

Walt Whitman sees President Lincoln traveling from the Soldiers' Home to the White House, and writes the following:

"I see the President almost every day, as I happen to live where he passes to or from his lodgings out of town. He never sleeps at the White House during the hot season, but has quarters at a healthy location some three miles north of the city, the Soldier's Home... I see very plainly Abraham Lincoln's dark brown face, with the deep-cut lines, the eyes, always to me with a deep latent sadness in the expression. We have got so that we exchange bows, and very cordial ones."



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DC Behind the Monuments: Tis himself

DC Behind the Monuments: Tis himself: These are actual quotes taken from Marion Barry, former Mayor of Washington, D.C. "The contagious people of Washington have sto...

Tis himself


These are actual quotes taken from Marion Barry, former Mayor of Washington, D.C.

"The contagious people of Washington have stood firm against diversity during this long period of increment weather." -- M. Barry, Mayor of Washington, DC

"I promise you a police car on every sidewalk." -- M. Barry, Mayor of Washington, DC

"If you take out the killings, Washington actually has a very very low crime rate." -- M. Barry, Mayor of Washington, DC

"First, it was not a strip bar, it was an erotic club. And second, what can I say? I'm a night owl." -- M. Barry, Mayor of Washington, DC

"Bitch set me up." -- M. Barry, Mayor of Washington, DC

"I am clearly more popular than Reagan. I am in my third term. Where's Reagan? Gone after two! Defeated by George Bush and Michael Dukakis no less." -- M. Barry, Mayor of Washington, DC

"The laws in this city are clearly racist. All laws are racist. The law of gravity is racist." -- M. Barry, Mayor of Washington, DC

"I am making this trip to Africa because Washington is an international city, just like Tokyo, Nigeria or Israel. As mayor, I am an international symbol. Can you deny that to Africa?" -- M. Barry, Mayor of Washington, DC

"People have criticized me because my security detail is larger than the president's. But you must ask yourself: are there more people who want to kill me than who want to kill the president? I can assure you there are." -- M. Barry, Mayor of Washington, DC

"The brave men who died in Vietnam, more than 100% of which were black, were the ultimate sacrifice." -- M. Barry, Mayor of Washington, DC

"I read a funny story about how the Republicans freed the slaves. The Republicans are the ones who created slavery by law in the 1600's. Abraham Lincoln freed the slaves and he was not a Republican." -- M. Barry, Mayor of Washington, DC (Lincoln was a Republican)

"What right does Congress have to go around making laws just because they deem it necessary?" -- M. Barry, Mayor of Washington, DC

"People blame me because these water mains break, but I ask you, if the water mains didn't break, would it be my responsibility to fix them then? WOULD IT!?!" -- M. Barry, Mayor of Washington, DC

"I am a great mayor; I am an upstanding Christian man; I am an intelligent man; I am a deeply educated man; I am a humble man." -- M. Barry, Mayor of Washington, DC 

Johnson's Sandwich Shop, Washington, D.C., was taken around 1950


1938


Skating in Rock Creek Park


Circa 1910


DC in the 1920





DC in the 1940s




May 24, 1865. Washington, District of Columbia. The Grand Review of the Army. Units of XX Army Corps, Army of Georgia, passing on Pennsylvania Avenue near the Treasur


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The Rarified Tribe: The Mayflower Hotel, Washington DC

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Photographs we've taken: ............so the guy left but the squirrel follo...

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Photographs we've taken: Bar at the Mayflower

Photographs we've taken: Bar at the Mayflower

Photographs we've taken: Random shots from a Sunday walk in Midtown DC

Photographs we've taken: Random shots from a Sunday walk in Midtown DC

Photographs we've taken: Statue on 18th and I in DC

Photographs we've taken: Statue on 18th and I in DC

In case you ever wondered...that's a statue of Ruben's in the 17th street side of the Renwick.


The Corcoran Museum Lions


Two large bronze lions on pedestals flank the staircase of the main entrance on 17th Street. These lions were bought in 1888 at the auction of the estate of Bill Holliday, founder of the Pony Express. 




Director Frederick B. McGuire acquired the bronzes for $1,900. They were displayed at the original home of the Corcoran Gallery on 17th Street and Pennsylvania Avenue (today the Renwick Gallery, part of the Smithsonian Institute). There they faced the street, but when moved to the new building in 1897, they were placed facing each other. The lions are copies from the originals by Antonio Canova, which adorn the cenotaph of Pope Clement XIII in Rome (below)

Monument to Clement XIII by Canova